Richard Nephew has rejoined Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy (CGEP) as a senior research scholar. Nephew most recently served as the deputy special envoy for Iran in the Biden-Harris administration.
 
“It was a privilege to serve in the US government again and for the Biden-Harris administration specifically,” said Nephew.  “I’m very pleased to return to Columbia University and the Center on Global Energy Policy to continue my research on the connections between energy policy and international security.”
 
Nephew previously served as principal deputy coordinator for sanctions policy at the US State Department and as the lead sanctions expert for the US team negotiating with Iran during the Obama administration. He played a central role in developing the sanctions imposed against Iran from 2006 to 2013, and was a senior member of the teams that negotiated the 2013 and 2015 Iran nuclear deals. 
 
“Richard is a leading expert on international sanctions and deterrence policy, and the intersection of these issues with energy and economic statecraft. Especially at this moment when the world is being reminded that the urgent priorities of climate change, energy, and national security are inextricably linked, we’re excited to welcome Richard back to the team,” said Jason Bordoff, founding director at CGEP and co-founding dean of the Columbia Climate School. “His experience working in the Obama and Biden administrations is invaluable. Now, more than ever, we need experts who understand the geopolitical nuances and risks associated with the energy transition.” 
 
Nephew also served as the director for Iran on the National Security Staff. Earlier in his career he served in the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation at the State Department and in the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security at the Department of Energy. 
 
Read Richard Nephew’s full biography here.